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Delaware Governor: Jack Markell


            

We Can Leave Fewer Children Behind

Written on: July 13th, 2015 in Education

In 2001, in a burst of bipartisanship driven by Sen. Ted Kennedy, Rep. John Boehner and President George W. Bush, Congress passed the most aggressive education reform effort in modern history. Known as No Child Left Behind, it encouraged and rewarded states for raising standards and achieving results for students.

Like most major laws, it wasn’t perfect. Along the way it engendered controversy, and it got caught in the typical crossfire of partisan political debate. But the law put the focus where it was needed—on accountability for all students and supporting low-performing schools.

This week, the Senate will take up a new bipartisan bill to modernize the law to reflect what we’ve learned about the needs of today’s schools, and it will be the closest Congress has gotten to passing an upgrade in more than a decade. As a governor and as a parent, I believe that Washington must seize this opportunity, resolve the few remaining issues and get it done.

NCLB’s focus on ensuring every student is counted was a game-changer. Before the law, too many students could slip through the cracks. NCLB changed that – if a school was struggling, officials needed to step in to improve it. And this change led to gains in achievement across the board – especially for students who had too often been overlooked.

In the three decades pre-NCLB, reading test scores for 9-year-olds inched up by hair’s width – averaging one-tenth of a point per year. Math scores were better but still improved at a barely perceptible two-tenths of a point per year. Since NCLB, reading and math score gains have increased by more than five-fold over the previous era. Nine-year-olds are adding nearly a point a year in reading and math scores, putting them on a trajectory to succeed.

African-American 9-year-olds gained nearly 2 points a year in reading in a post-NCLB world, decreasing the stubborn and persistent gap between those students and their white peers. In my state of Delaware, we’ve gone from less than one-third of 4th graders being proficient or advanced in math to 42%, and we made progress closing our 8th grade reading achievement gap, reducing the difference between average white and black students from 28 points to 21 points. Between 2000 and 2013, our graduation rate improved by 5 points.

We should celebrate this progress, but we should not be satisfied. NCLB had many limitations, including calling for an unrealistic 100% in student proficiency and leaving states with little room to tailor investments and interventions to improve low-performing schools. The Obama administration’s waivers provided some flexibility, but their short timelines give states little ability to plan ahead or set out longer-term, more ambitious goals. If left unchanged, NCLB would label at least half of our 100,000 schools as failing and force states to pursue waivers perpetually into the future, with no guidance about what requirements future administrations might impose. It is very difficult to improve schools when operating on such shifting ground.

The bipartisan Senate bill addresses many of the major problems with NCLB and provides states with both consistent federal guardrails and the flexibility to implement them. It allows states to design accountability systems based on their own circumstances and ensures that academic factors like test scores and graduation rates will still be given substantial weight, while also allowing states to move away from test-only measures to include more holistic determinations of college and career readiness.

But it needs amending on the Senate floor to retain the provisions of NCLB that worked to improve student success: it must do more to require states to identify those schools that are struggling and act meaningfully if their schools aren’t meeting the goals they have set. The answer need not be a federally-mandated menu of specific interventions, but if schools are falling short, states should be held accountable for remedying those problems.

When NCLB was first passed in 2001, it was after three decades of stagnant school performance. Since then, we have broken free and made gains. Having watched this at the state level, it’s clear what is needed to build on this progress. With a few alterations, this bipartisan bill could propel student achievement even further.

 

Original Post from MSNBC

The Key Obstacle to Restoring the Middle Class

Written on: May 22nd, 2015 in Effective & Efficient Government

By Jack Markell and Jonathan Cowan Jack Markell, a Democrat, is governor of Delaware. Jonathan Cowan is president of the think tank Third Way. Looking for an agenda that captures the imagination of our beleaguered middle class? Then solve this puzzle: From 2001 to 2014, the U.S. economy grew at an average annual rate of […]


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Written on: May 11th, 2015 in Job Creation

Those of us who have spent most of our lives in Delaware know what DuPont means to this state. We travel the duPont Highway, attend schools named after duPont family members, and tour former duPont estates. The presence of the duPont family and the great company that they built here in Delaware is so ubiquitous […]


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School Choice Works, Privatization Won’t

Written on: April 22nd, 2015 in Education

With the next presidential campaign getting under way, pundits have quickly focused more on the horse race than on where the candidates stand on important issues like improving public education. One area that deserves far more attention is the array of proposals to divert public spending on education into private school vouchers or “education savings […]


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A Week to Make Delaware a Better Place

Written on: April 10th, 2015 in Helping Our Neighbors

The late American author and poet Maya Angelou wrote that “when we give cheerfully and accept gratefully, everyone is blessed.” Every year, thousands of Delawareans put those words into action, affirming that ours is a state of neighbors. The Week of Service, which runs April 12-18, is an opportunity to highlight the contributions of our […]


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